My final outcome for my study of the “Typography - Book Cover” unit.This brief was to design a cover for the popular Penguin book “One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest”.
Here, the image is a huge metaphor - combined of three things:Firstly, the two birds are the most obvious here. They symbolise Randie and Chief, two of the main characters within the novel. The birds are escaping together, as the duo plan to do in the book.Secondly, we have the cube. Here, it simply symbolises the mental ward, or their “prison”.Lastly, we have the repeat pattern on the cube. In my original development ideas, the cube was to be blank, and very skeletal looking. Here, I filled it with a pattern. The white and black dots represent eyes - a sort of “Big Brother” idea, symbolising Nurse Ratched’s watchful eyes, and military regimes.The lack of colour also helps to represent Nurse Ratched’s regime - no fun, no laughter, no colour. Grey. 
The typefaces are simple, ranging from Helvetica to Didot. The Didot featured here helps to maintain the “Penguin Classics” feel of the novel, and is also passive enough to allow the image to represent the novel itself.
I am very pleased with this outcome.

My final outcome for my study of the “Typography - Book Cover” unit.
This brief was to design a cover for the popular Penguin book “One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest”.

Here, the image is a huge metaphor - combined of three things:
Firstly, the two birds are the most obvious here. They symbolise Randie and Chief, two of the main characters within the novel. The birds are escaping together, as the duo plan to do in the book.
Secondly, we have the cube. Here, it simply symbolises the mental ward, or their “prison”.
Lastly, we have the repeat pattern on the cube. In my original development ideas, the cube was to be blank, and very skeletal looking. Here, I filled it with a pattern. The white and black dots represent eyes - a sort of “Big Brother” idea, symbolising Nurse Ratched’s watchful eyes, and military regimes.
The lack of colour also helps to represent Nurse Ratched’s regime - no fun, no laughter, no colour. Grey. 

The typefaces are simple, ranging from Helvetica to Didot. The Didot featured here helps to maintain the “Penguin Classics” feel of the novel, and is also passive enough to allow the image to represent the novel itself.

I am very pleased with this outcome.

Tuesday Mar 3 @ 07:55pm
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